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HomeGeneral InfoPlaces to Visit in BangaloreAttara Kacheri: A Timeless Symbol of Justice in the Heart of Bangalore

Attara Kacheri: A Timeless Symbol of Justice in the Heart of Bangalore

Last Updated on March 4, 2023 by Tariq

Attara Kacheri is one of the most iconic buildings in Bangalore and is a must-visit destination for anyone interested in history, architecture, and the Indian judicial system.

The building has played a significant role in the history of Bangalore, serving as the office of the British Governor of Mysore, the Secretariat of the Mysore government, and now, the seat of the Karnataka High Court.

Attara Kacheri is important not only from a legal perspective but also from an architectural standpoint.

The neoclassical design of the building is breathtaking, with its beautiful columns, arches, and red brick façade.

Visitors can tour the building, see the High Court in session, and learn more about the building’s fascinating history.

Attara Kacheri, which means “eighteen offices” in Kannada, was built during the British era and had a rich history and cultural significance.

In this article, we will delve into the details of Attara Kacheri Bangalore, from its history to architecture and the functions it serves today.

What is Attara Kacheri Bangalore?

Attara Kacheri Bangalore is a red two-storied stone building in Bangalore’s Cubbon Park area.

Attara Kacheri Bangalore

The building was constructed in 1867 during the British colonial era and was initially built to serve as the office of the British Governor of Mysore.

It was later converted into the Secretariat of the Mysore government, and in 1884, it was transformed into a full-fledged High Court.

The Bangalore High Court hears a wide range of cases, including civil, criminal, and constitutional matters, and is one of the busiest High Courts in India.

History of Attara Kacheri Bangalore

History of Attara Kacheri Bangalore

(Source: Wikipedia)

Attara Kacheri, which means “eighteen offices” in Urdu, has a rich history that dates back to the British colonial era in India.

The building was constructed in 1864 by the British architect Richard Hieram Sankey and served as the office of the British Residency of Mysore State.

Later, it became the secretariat of the Mysore Government until 1956, when the state was reorganized into linguistic regions, and the capital was moved to Bangalore.

After the capital was moved to Bangalore, Attara Kacheri became the High Court of Karnataka in 1956.

The building underwent major renovations and was converted into a court of law, with additional wings and chambers built to accommodate the growing legal system.

The building was designed in a neoclassical style, with ornate columns and arches, and was one of the earliest examples of Indo-Saracenic architecture in Bangalore.

Today, Attara Kacheri is a landmark Bangalore building symbolizing the city’s rich history and cultural heritage.

The building has witnessed many important events and landmark cases in the history of Karnataka and India and is considered one of the most important historical monuments in the city.

The Karnataka government restored and preserved the building, and it is open to visitors who wish to explore its history and architecture.

The Architecture of Attara Kacheri Bangalore

Attara Kacheri is a magnificent example of neoclassical architecture, popular in the late 19th century.

The building was designed by Richard Hieram Sankey, a British architect who also designed the famous Lalbagh Botanical Gardens in Bangalore.

The architecture of Attara Kacheri is influenced by the neoclassical style and Indo-Saracenic architecture, which was popular during the British colonial period.

The building’s façade is made of red bricks, which give it a unique look.

The building has 20 majestic Corinthian columns that support the entrance and the balcony.

The façade is decorated with pediments, arches, and pilasters typical of neoclassical architecture.

The building is spread across two floors, and the lower floor houses the High Court, while the upper floor houses the Karnataka State Archives.

The building has a central courtyard, which is surrounded by corridors on both floors.

The Architecture of Attara Kacheri Bangalore

The passages have arched openings and are supported by rows of columns.

The interior of Attara Kacheri is equally impressive, with spacious courtrooms, chambers, and corridors.

The courtrooms are designed in a classic style, with high ceilings, large windows, and intricate woodwork.

The building also has a library, which houses a collection of legal books and documents.

Attara Kacheri is considered one of Bangalore’s finest examples of Indo-Saracenic architecture.

The building has been beautifully restored and preserved by the Karnataka government and is a popular tourist attraction in the city.

Functions of Attara Kacheri Bangalore

Dispensing Justice: Attara Kacheri serves as the seat of the Karnataka High Court and is responsible for dispensing justice in Karnataka. The High Court hears various cases, including civil, criminal, and constitutional matters, and its verdicts are final and binding.

Preservation of Records: Attara Kacheri also houses the Karnataka State Archives on its upper floor, which is responsible for preserving and maintaining historical documents, manuscripts, and other records related to the state’s history.

Legal Services: The building also provides legal services to litigants, including a spacious waiting area, elevators, air conditioning, and Wi-Fi connectivity.

Judicial Education: Attara Kacheri also serves as a center for judicial education and provides training and education to judges, lawyers, and court staff.

Cultural Events: The building is also a popular destination for cultural events and festivals, such as the Bangalore International Film Festival, the Bengaluru Poetry Festival, and the Bangalore Literature Festival.

Attara Kacheri plays a vital role in the administration of justice in Karnataka and is an essential institution for preserving the state’s history and culture.

The building provides legal services to litigants, serves as a center for judicial education, and hosts several cultural events throughout the year, making it a significant landmark in Bangalore.

Attara Kacheri Bangalore’s Role in the Bangalore High Court

Attara Kacheri is the seat of the Karnataka High Court, which has jurisdiction over the entire state of Karnataka.

The High Court hears a wide range of cases, including civil, criminal, and constitutional matters, and its verdicts are final and binding.

The building serves as the headquarters of the High Court and houses several courtrooms, chambers for judges, offices for court staff, and facilities for litigants.

The building’s architecture is well-suited for its role in the High Court.

The central courtyard and the surrounding corridors provide ample space for litigants and lawyers to wait and move around.

The building’s layout also ensures enough natural light and ventilation in the courtrooms, crucial for maintaining a comfortable and conducive environment for legal proceedings.

Attara Kacheri also supports the High Court, such as record-keeping, library services, and research facilities.

The building’s upper floor houses the Karnataka State Archives, which is responsible for preserving and maintaining historical documents, manuscripts, and other records of the state’s history.

This makes Attara Kacheri an essential institution for preserving legal and historical records in Karnataka.

Important Cases Heard in Attara Kacheri Bangalore

Several important cases have been heard in the Bangalore High Court, including the case of the former Chief Minister of Karnataka, B.S. Yeddyurappa, in a corruption case in 2012.

Some of the notable cases include:

Rajan Pillai Case: One of the most high-profile cases heard in Attara Kacheri was the Rajan Pillai case.

Pillai, a prominent businessman, was accused of evading taxes and other financial irregularities.

The case garnered significant media attention and was closely followed by the public.

Kaveri River Water Dispute: The Kaveri River Water Dispute is a long-standing dispute between the states of Karnataka and Tamil Nadu over water sharing from the Kaveri River.

The case has been heard in Attara Kacheri several times, and the High Court has issued several verdicts.

Bangalore-Mysore Infrastructure Corridor (BMIC) Case: The BMIC case was a dispute between the government of Karnataka and a private consortium over constructing a new infrastructure corridor connecting Bangalore and Mysore.

The case was heard in Attara Kacheri, eventually leading to the project’s cancellation.

IAS Officer D.K. Ravi Case: The case involving the death of IAS officer D.K. Ravi was heard in Attara Kacheri.

Ravi was found dead in his apartment, and his death has initially ruled a suicide.

However, his family and supporters alleged foul play, and the case was eventually transferred to the Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) for further investigation.

These are just a few of the notable cases that have been heard in Attara Kacheri.

The High Court has a long and distinguished history of upholding the rule of law and dispensing justice in Karnataka.

Facilities Provided in Attara Kacheri Bangalore

Courtrooms: The building houses several courtrooms where legal proceedings are conducted.

Chambers for judges: The building also provides chambers for judges to prepare for their hearings and deliver their verdicts.

Offices for court staff: The building has offices for court staff to carry out administrative functions such as record-keeping, filing, and research.

Library: Attara Kacheri has a library open to lawyers and judges. The library contains legal texts, journals, and other resources essential for legal research.

Record-keeping: The building houses the High Court’s record-keeping office, which is responsible for maintaining and preserving legal records and documents.

Waiting areas: The building has several waiting areas for litigants and their family members to wait for their hearings.

Restrooms: The building has clean and well-maintained restrooms for visitors and court staff.

Cafeteria: Attara Kacheri has a cafeteria where visitors can buy snacks, drinks, and meals.

Parking: The building provides parking facilities for visitors and court staff.

Security: The building has a high level of security to ensure the safety and security of visitors and court staff. Metal detectors, CCTV cameras, and security personnel are stationed at various points in the building.

These facilities are essential for the smooth functioning of the High Court and the delivery of justice to the people of Karnataka.

Visiting Attara Kacheri Bangalore

Attara Kacheri Walkway Corridor

(Source: Bangalore Tourism)

If you’re interested in visiting Attara Kacheri in Bangalore, here is some useful information:

Visitors are allowed to enter the building during court hours, which are from 10:30 am to 4:30 pm, Monday through Friday.

Entry to the building is free, but visitors need to pass through a security check and present a valid ID card.

Visitors are expected to dress modestly and avoid wearing shorts, sleeveless shirts, or other revealing clothing.

Photography is prohibited inside the building, and visitors are not permitted to carry any electronic devices, including cameras and mobile phones.

The building is in Cubbon Park, one of Bangalore’s most famous parks.

Visitors can take a stroll in the park before or after their visit to Attara Kacheri.

Guided tours are available for visitors who want to learn more about the building’s history and architecture.

These tours can be arranged by contacting the Karnataka State Tourism Development Corporation.

Visitors can also attend court proceedings, but they need to obtain a special pass from the Registrar’s office.

These passes are issued on a first-come, first-served basis.

Attara Kacheri is an important landmark in Bangalore, and visiting the building is a great way to learn more about the city’s history and legal system.

Events and Festivals at Attara Kacheri Bangalore

Attara Kacheri in Bangalore hosts several events and festivals throughout the year.

Some of the notable ones are:

Independence Day and Republic Day Celebrations: Attara Kacheri hosts the Independence Day and Republic Day celebrations every year on August 15th and January 26th, respectively.

These events feature flag-hoisting ceremonies, cultural performances, and speeches by prominent personalities.

Law Day: Law Day is celebrated on November 26th every year to commemorate the adoption of the Indian Constitution.

Attara Kacheri hosts several events, including legal seminars, lectures, and cultural programs.

Legal Aid Clinics: Attara Kacheri organizes legal aid clinics for underprivileged communities to provide them with legal advice and assistance.

These clinics are usually held on weekends and holidays.

Book Launches: The building also hosts book launches for legal texts, biographies, and other works related to law and justice.

These events are usually open to the public and provide a platform for authors to interact with readers.

Cultural Programs: Attara Kacheri hosts several cultural programs, including music and dance performances, art exhibitions, and theater productions.

These events showcase the rich cultural heritage of Karnataka and other regions of India.

Attara Kacheri’s events and festivals provide a platform for the legal community and the general public to unite and celebrate important milestones in India’s legal and cultural history.

How to Visit Attara Kacheri Bangalore

How to visit Attara Kacheri Bangalore

Attara Kacheri is located in the heart of Bangalore city and is easily accessible by various modes of transportation.

Here are some ways to visit Attara Kacheri:

By Bus: The BMTC (Bangalore Metropolitan Transport Corporation) operates several bus routes that connect Attara Kacheri with other parts of the city. Visitors can take a bus to Cubbon Park, a short walk from the building.

By Metro: The nearest metro station to Attara Kacheri is the MG Road Metro Station, about 1.5 km away. Visitors can take a metro train to this station and then hire a taxi or auto-rickshaw to reach the building.

By Auto-Rickshaw/Taxi: Visitors can hire an auto-rickshaw or taxi to reach Attara Kacheri. They can ask the driver to drop them off at the building or at Cubbon Park, a short walk away.

Attara Kacheri is a popular tourist destination in Bangalore, and there are several ways to reach the building.

Visitors can choose the mode of transportation that suits them best and enjoy the city’s beauty while on their way to the building.

Location of Attara Kacheri Bangalore

FAQs

Who started Attara Kacheri?

Attara Kacheri was constructed by the British architect Richard Hieram Sankey in 1864 during the British colonial era in India.

What is the history of Attara Kacheri?

Attara Kacheri served as the office of the British Residency of Mysore State and later as the secretariat of the Mysore Government until 1956. After that, it became the High Court of Karnataka. It is one of Bangalore’s oldest and most iconic buildings, with a rich history dating back to India’s British colonial era.

Who is the founder of 18 Kacheri?

There is no specific founder of Attara Kacheri, as it was constructed to serve as the office of the British Residency of Mysore State. “Attara Kacheri” means “eighteen offices” in Urdu and refers to the 18 departments housed in the building during the colonial era.

Who built Bangalore High Court?

The High Court of Karnataka was established in 1884, but it was housed in various locations before it was finally moved to Attara Kacheri in 1956. The building was designed by the British architect Richard Hieram Sankey and was originally constructed as the office of the British Residency of Mysore State.

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Tariq
Tariqhttps://tariqsp.com
An entrepreneur based in Bangalore with a passion for blogging, real estate, and digital marketing. Connect with me on Instagram @imtariqsp.
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